Posts Tagged ‘online advertising’

OpenX Adserver 2.8 Release

Permalink   Posted by Tom Benway

Being a big proponent of OpenSource software, I’ve been using the OpenX ad server platform for many years now. Needless-to-say I was very happy to have recently downloaded and installed their latest release which features some huge improvements to their only shortcoming- the user interface.

logo_openx

OpenX is a free PHP/mySQL software thats fantastic for delivering advertisements for web for pretty much any kind of delivery from small ad tiles on your website or full server functionality (like for media players). Recently implemented on a Flash radio player developed for my buddies at CustomChannels, I’ve found it to be an easily customized and implemented solution for keeping tracking of ads and getting professional level statistics.

If you’re looking for a way to increase revenue to your website or implement a full-scale ad campaign for media delivery, ask me more about OpenX!

Mayor Chooses Online Sources for Public Notices

Permalink   Posted by Tom Benway

I read an interesting article on Yahoo! Tech news today following a case of a mayor in a suburb of Raleigh, North Carolina who has decided to begin posting public notices online rather than using local newspapers. The mayor claims to have saved the city budget a surplus of $13,000 by utilizing online advertising rather than papers and it has caused quite a stir in the local media since state law previously required all public notices to be in newspaper form.

I think this poses and interesting conundrum: posting public notices (such as re-zoning and land developments in this case) online obviously shows a clear-cut pricing difference than newspapers which arguable saves everyone money, but at the same time folks who don’t have internet access (do they even exist anymore?) could miss out on important public messages.

I’m all for the death of newspapers and not just because I’m an online aficionado- I happen to think the newspaper had plenty of opportunities to change its pricing model, but like many dying media industries, refused to do so while it was still profitable. Evolve or die, no?